Category Archives: World News

Education Rights for Women (Or lack there of)

By: Cassandra Hedrick

In first world countries like America there is not really a gap between boys and girls school attendance. However, in many countries around the world there is an issue with girls not being able to get an education. In Afghanistan, girls only make up 1/3 of students and they make up 2/3s of illiterate adults worldwide. While we are moving in the direction of gender equality when it comes to education, we are not quite there. There are many factors contributing to this lack of education for girls, the main ones being poverty, race or ethnicity, and location.

Kids in poverty stricken countries are less likely to attend school. Girls are 2% less likely to go to school because they tend to stay at home and help with household duties. Similarly, girls from rural areas are less likely to attend school for the same reason, as well as because of the distance they live from schools. In parts of the world where there is a lot of war and violence, girls may not be able to attend school because it is dangerous for them to go. However, no matter where are in the world, racial and ethnic minorities always attend school at lower rates. This means the gender disparities are accentuated.

We need to pay more attention to gender inequality in education. Just because we don’t see it very often in America, doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen all over the world. There are gender disparities in education, caused by poverty, location, and race. If you want to help fix this, you can visit the United Nations Girls Education Initiative to find out more.

Protections for Transgender Women Or lack Thereof

By: Cassandra Hedrick

Transgender women are one the least protected demographics in America. They are often murdered but it is rarely investigated. In many states, Transgendered individuals can be discriminated against in both housing and employment. However, they are still people and American citizens and there for are entitles to the same rights and protections as cisgendered individuals.

While things are getting better for the trans community, they are still missing many of the same rights most Americans enjoy. They are often targeted for unnecessary questioning and random pat downs by police and are not allowed to ask for an officer of a different gender. When they are in prison, Male to Female transgendered individuals are often housed in male prisons. Not to mention the fact they can be arrested for using the bathroom that does not match their biological sex.

In addition, insurance companies can refuse to cover someone who has been diagnosed with gender dysphoria (feeling as though they are a gender other than the one assigned to them at birth). Also employers are not required to provide transition related medical treatment as a part of employee insurance policies.

That being said, we are on the right track. California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and the District of Columbia all have protections for transgendered individuals. There have also been several court cases that have provided protections. For instance, the department of Housing and Urban Development is not allowed to discriminate against anyone from the LGBTQ+ community and Title VII protects them against employer discrimination in some states. Things can continue to get better if we all come together and accept trans people as people and treat them as such.

What is Intersectionality, and Why Does it Matter?

By: Jillian James

There has been a lot of discussion among feminists lately about the topic of intersectionality. But what does it mean, and why is it important? Simply put, intersectionality is the conversion and consideration of different cultures and people that are a part of the feminist community. For example, a young Latina feminist may have different priorities than a middle-aged white woman who considers herself a feminist. Being intersectional in your thinking means considering the voices and needs of ALL groups who stand by your cause.

 

The feminist community has been criticized in the past for only including the voices of white women. Scholar and professor Kimberle Crenshaw introduced the topic of intersectional feminism in a 1989 paper that she wrote entitled “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory, and Antiracist Politics.” She stated that black women had been excluded from feminist activities and feminist theory, and that a black woman’s race and gender could not be seen as two separate entities.

 

A key part of understanding intersectionality is comprehending that feminism is not one-size-fits-all. It is a very personal thing for each woman who decides to call herself a feminist, and every woman will have certain issues that are close to her. Some women may be concerned about he gender pay gap, while others are worried about issues like paid maternity leave or abortion access. Considering the experiences and voices of every woman of every social, racial, and economic background is the key to making feminism as inclusive and representative as possible.

SOURCES:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/01/19/feminism-intersectionality-racism-sexism-class/96633750/

http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/01/why-our-feminism-must-be-intersectional/

 

The Social Construction of Gender and the Gender-Neutral Parenting Trend

By: Jillian James

From the moment we are born, we are classified as either biologically male or female and raised according to our gender. Girls get pink toys and clothes, boys get blue. Girls wear dresses, boys don’t. However, there is a distinct difference between your biological sex and your gender. A person’s sex is refers to their anatomy, while a person’s gender refers to a person’s concept of himself or herself.

 

As more and more social science research has been conducted, scholars have realized something very important- gender is a social construct. Just because a boy has long hair or wears makeup doesn’t make him any less of a male biologically. He is just going against his society’s prescribed ideal about what a male should look like.

 

Gender is a social construct because the definition of masculinity and femininity has changed in our society over time. Less than one hundred years ago women were given the right to vote and a woman wearing pants could cause a scandal. The social construction of gender also changes from country to country, region to region, state to state. Every culture has its own prescribed gender ideals and ways of thinking. This is all proof that gender ideals don’t have a connection to a person’s biology.

 

So what can we learn from this? Luckily, society is becoming more and more accepting and has gained more understanding about gender fluidity and societies’ pressure to conform to gender norms. This is very positive step in the right direction.

 

The new trend in parenting is raising a child to be “gender-neutral”. This means that you don’t raise your child as being distinctively male or female or you don’t make them follow prescribed gender roles. Instead you let them grow and develop independently and make their own choices about their gender as they get older. This is becoming very popular in other countries like Sweden and is now making its way to the United States.

 

There are different levels to this type of parenting. Some couples don’t even reveal the gender of their child and raise their children as neither male nor female while others simply encourage their children to break gender stereotypes. Things as simple as buying both boy and girl toys and encouraging them a wide variety interests can help children feel comfortable being themselves.

 

Having prescribed gender roles can be harmful. Human beings are incredibly complex, multifaceted creatures. They can’t fit into any one box or type. The people who struggle to conform to the societal norm can feel ostracized and begin to question themselves and their self-worth. By understanding and accepting that both boys and girls can have a wide variety of interests that may include things that are typically associated with the opposite gender, we can start to understand, accept, and encourage them to be their truest selves.

 

Source:

http://everydayfeminism.com/2015/06/difference-sex-and-gender/

http://www.parents.com/parenting/gender-neutral-parenting/

 

Defunding women’s healthcare worldwide

By: Nicole McLaren

https://mic.com/articles/173529/this-week-in-reproductive-rights-trump-defunds-the-un-s-maternal-health-fund#.qmpHqXwjV

The U.S. is in the position to have an impact on many issues all across the world, one of these being access to healthcare for women. The current administration has attacked women’s reproductive rights already with both words and policy not only in the US but globally. They have decided to defund the United Nation’s Global Maternal Health Organization.

This is an organization that provides reproductive healthcare including abortion services to women all over the world. According to the administration this is to prevent the UN from conducting “coercive abortion and involuntary sterilization”. This claim is baseless according to the as there is no evidence that the organization does either of these two things.

George W. Bush used the same argument to defund the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), claiming it was supporting China’s one child policy with these funds. Even though the UN has expressed that they do not support the one child policy and no funds are used to support it.

The UNFPA and UN Global Maternal Health Organization provide contraceptives, family planning services, prenatal care, abortion, sexual and reproductive health services as well as education for populations all over the planet. This will take away over $70 million from the organizations but this only makes up 7% of the organizations budget. This is not the first attack on international women’s healthcare that the administration has committed. They have reinstated the Global Gag Rule which is a ban on U.S. funding to be given to any organization that provides safe abortions.

It is important for women to have access to reproductive healthcare, including abortions, not only in the U.S. but across the globe. The current administration is working to limit access to these services for all women and we must combat that by standing up for the rights of women. One way we can do that is having access to information. The UNFPA has a newsletter that anyone can sign up for so that you can be informed about these issues. Here’s the link https://visitor.r20.constantcontact.com/manage/optin?v=001-YNFZmXHhSP25d9kiBTi0ZxtEwaeIcM-UeLsaXPKYoHs5SAGE1WbNakIrfhkc_3wTTkXkKXbHJpBnXtbqkTATg_O174jFAyLQdNkQkPKQAk%3D&MERGE0=

How Justice Gorsuch’s could impact your ability to access healthcare

By: Nicole McLaren

The battle between Republicans and Democrats for the Supreme Court seat is officially over as Gorsuch was sworn into the lifelong position earlier this week. He is replacing Scalia who passed away and left an open seat for more than a year. There are some key things that you need to know about his views that could impact your rights to healthcare.

  • His views on abortion are unclear

He has not ruled on a case that deals with abortion. Although we can make some assumptions from his book in 2006 about assisted suicide where he states “the intentional taking of human life by a private person is always wrong”.

  • His stance on maternity leave is also not clear

Two former students have stated that he accused women of using their companies for maternity benefits. He has claimed the students misunderstood him and that he was trying to teach young women about the unfair treatment they will receive in the work place and during the interview process.

  • He has a record of putting corportations over women’s reproductive health rights

      In the Hobby Lobby case he ruled that closely held businesses are not required to provide their employees contraceptive coverage that conflicts with the religious beliefs of the owner.

With this knowledge we can work to combat the rhetoric against women’s right to access reproductive healthcare services by working in our communities to try to ensure the safety and rights of all women. This can be done through volunteering with organizations like Planned Parenthood or even sharing the stories of how women have benefited from access to reproductive healthcare services. The US federal government has a blog that shares these stories here is the link https://www.womenshealth.gov/blog.

Where Your Tomatoes Come From

By: Nicole McLaren

When people think about ethical eating they may think about the treatment and consumption of meat but it is important to also consider the people the farmworkers who make your salad possible. The rights of farmworkers in the U.S. have been neglected by the government and their labor exploited by employers.

This week, March 24th-31st, was Farmworkers Awareness Week. This is a time dedicated by community members and student activists across the country to focus on farmworker rights. Organizations like YAYA and the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) are leaders in this area.

The CIW are currently working on their fair food campaign to push Wendy’s and other companies to pay their fair share to farmworkers who pick their fruits and vegetables. Over 700 people protested earlier this week in Columbus, headquarter of Wendy’s.

This fight has been going on for about a decade and has seen success with many large corporations. The list of companies that they have a fair food agreement with range from Walmart, Mcdonalds, and Aramark to Whole Foods and Trader Joes. The fair food program relies on the the farmworkers, growers and buyers like Wendy’s.

Another important component is the consumer, you and I. The CIW runs the Campaign for Fair Food to educate consumers on how to use their buying power as leverage to improve the treatment of farmworkers. You can get involved in their campaigns as well. Here’s the link http://www.allianceforfairfood.org/take-action/

 

 

 

“Lean In”: How to Help Other Women Achieve Their Potential

By: Jillian James

In 2015, 104 women served on the United States Congress, making up only 19% of the 535 members. Currently, women only hold 5% of all Fortune 500 CEO roles. However, women make up over half of the total U.S. population.

It is absolutely vital for leadership to be diverse. The United States is comprised of a vast amount people of different genders, backgrounds, ethnicities and religions. If the leadership is equally as diverse, then different perspectives and issues will be brought to the table.

So how can we inspire more women to become involved in leadership?

When you see a fellow woman succeed, then go out of your way to acknowledge it. Encourage them to pursue their passions and instill within them the confidence to try to succeed. If you are in a leadership position, then it important that you genuinely listen to ideas and concerns of your subordinates. Be accessible to them and treat their thoughts with respect and integrity.

If you are a woman in a position of power, don’t be afraid to use your voice. Speak up and give your unique perspective on issues, and make sure that you are providing equal opportunities for others to rise up.

            By taking the time to acknowledge the power and light that each individual woman has, you can create an uplifting and positive culture where women feel empowered to use their voice and take action.

 

Sources:

https://www.theguardian.com/women-in-leadership/series/inspiring-leaders

http://www.cawp.rutgers.edu/women-us-congress-2015

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_women_CEOs_of_Fortune_500_companies

 

 

 

 

I Switched to Organic Tampons: Here is What Happened

 

By: Cassandra Hedrick

This month I decided to try organic cotton tampons. I tried this brand called L. They have no chemicals like chlorine, rayon, dyes, or fragrances. This means they are just cotton. Plus, for every product bought from them they donate a product to a girl in a developing country.

One of the main reasons I decided to switch to organic tampons is because it reduces the chance of toxic shock syndrome. Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is bacterial infection that you can get from using super absorbent tampons. The chemicals found in normal tampons increases your chances of this.

After switching I found that I really liked these tampons. In my opinion, they are more absorbent than normal tampons. I was able to keep them in for about five hours at a time without any leaks, not even when I wore them overnight. I also found that I had less severe cramps. I normally have awful pelvic and abdominal cramps during my period and this month I had hardly any. Of course, this is my personal experience and yours may vary.

 

I think these tampons are good alternative to normal tampons. They don’t have chemicals and lessen the chance of TSS. They cost the same amount as normal tampons and come in an adorable jar. You can get at Target or from thisisl.com. If you want to try them out you can get 15% off here.

Sex Education: The Importance of a College’s Sexual Culture and Sexual Support Systems

By: Jillian James

When you choose a college, you may consider factors like academics and extracurricular involvement. However, it is important that you look at your potential college’s sexual culture and what resources are available on campus. This is critically important because you want to join an environment that is accepting, welcoming, and that will be able to offer a wide variety resources.

Here are some important factors to consider when judging a college’s sexual culture:

  1. Is free birth control offered on campus, like condoms? How accessible are they?
  2. Is there a women’s clinic on campus? Would you feel comfortable going there if you had an issue?
  3. Does the college offer STD/STI testing? Is it free?
  4. Is the campus friendly to the LGBTQ community? Are there clubs and events for LGBTQ students?
  5. Are there support systems in place for survivors of sexual assault and rape?
  6. Are classes offered about sex and sexuality, or is it a taboo topic academically?
  7. What is the social culture like? Do men or women control it? Is their social pressure to hook up or have casual sex?

These questions are all incredibly important because they can help you have a happy, product, and safe time at college. If some of these support structures don’t exist at your current college or university, try to implement them yourself and attempt to create a healthy sexual culture on your campus.